Transformation
All Objects in Incari exist in 3D space, and have a set of Attributes to define their Transformation data. Transformation is divided into three Vector3 type Attributes: Position, Rotation, and Scale.
This page offers overview descriptions of the three Transformation Attributes (Position, Rotation, Scale) and of one special case, that of Groups.
Moreover, there are two modes for performing Transformations:
  • Global: Objects are transformed with respect to the Scene axes.
  • Local: Each Object is transformed with respect to its own axes.

Position

Position is defined by three values, representing each of the three axes of a three dimensional Cartesian coordinate system.
In most 2D graphics applications, you will typically see a coordinate system with the origin (0,0) at the top-left corner of a document, and the X value increasing from left-to-right and the Y value increasing from top-to-bottom.
In Incari, coordinates are in 3D Euclidean space, with the origin (0, 0, 0) at the center, and the x value increasing from center-to-right, the y value increasing from center-to-top and the z value increasing from center-to-front.
Any point in space can be determined by these x, y, and z values.

Rotation

The Rotation Attribute represents the Euler angle of rotation of an Object along each of the rotation axes. An Object can be rotated in either Local or Global space. In Local space, any adjustments will be made along its own axes, not the axes of the Scene itself. On the other hand, rotations in Global space are performed with respect to the Scene axes.
Axes can be thought of as being like three skewers going through the Object and intersecting at the Object's Pivot Point.
For more detail, see:

Scale

Scale multiplies the size of an Object along its axes, relative to its Origin. By default, Scale is set to x=1, y=1, z=1, meaning that it is at 100% of its size on all axes.

Groups

There is one special case that is worth noting, that of Objects that are part of a Group. In this case, the Position and Rotation Attributes of the Objects are relative to the Position and Rotation of the Group, respectively.
For this to be clearer, let us see two examples, one for the Position Attribute and one for the Rotation one.
Consider a Group containing one Object, a Cube. Setting the Position of the Group to x=100 and the Position of the Cube to x=100 will result in the Cube being located at x=200 in the Scene space.
For an illustration of this, see the following example, in which there are two Cubes: one with Position x=100 in a Group with Position x=100 and another one that is not part of a Group and has Position x=200. For visualization purposes, the two Cubes have been set at different heights along the Y axis.
The same applies to rotations. Consider again a Group containing one Object, a Cube. Setting the Rotation of the Group to x=30 and the Rotation of the Cube to x=30 will result in the Cube being rotated 60 degrees with respect to the Scene coordinate system.
For an illustration of this, see the following example, in which there are two Cubes: one with Rotation x=30 in a Group with Rotation x=30 and another one that is not part of a Group and has its Rotation set to x=60. For visualization purposes, the two Cubes have been set at different heights along the Y axis.